Small Cards, Big Picture: Constructing students’ narrative frameworks

A HIESIG Open Seminar, Monday 9th April 2018, UCL Institute of Education, 5.30-7.30pm

Dr. Lindsay Gibson, Faculty of Education, University of Alberta

Most history teachers agree that one of the purposes of learning history should be to develop students’ ability to construct narratives and synoptic “big picture” overviews of the past. Despite this commonly held belief, many students leave school with fragments of historical knowledge and narratives, but few can assemble the knowledge accumulated throughout their school history career into coherent narratives, and those who can often produce narratives that are formulaic, simplistic, and naïve.

Few empirical studies have investigated the degree to which historical thinking pedagogy and resources designed to strengthen students’ frameworks of knowledge have any impact on facilitating and accelerating students’ ability to construct narratives that are coherent and purposeful, include accurate historical details, are comprehensive in terms of the inclusion of significant events from the history of Canada, and include perspectives of different historical individuals and groups.

In this presentation I discuss the theoretical background, research design, methodological approaches, research instruments, data collection and analysis procedures, and results of a small-scale (n=~22) pilot study that investigated the extent to which historical thinking pedagogy and the use of historical event cards improved students’ ability to construct high quality narratives about the history of Canada.

To register for this free seminar, please follow this link.

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1 Response to Small Cards, Big Picture: Constructing students’ narrative frameworks

  1. Pingback: “There are too many camera angles!” | Goldilocks History

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